For example, if a spirit wants to give the psychic medium the name Sandy, they might flash (in the psychic medium’s mind) the face of a person whom the psychic medium knows named Sandy. If they want to get the psychic medium to say the word “coffee,” they might show the psychic medium someone’s cat that had the name Coffee. This can be confusing and requires that the psychic medium interpret what they are seeing in their mind. For instance, the psychic medium might say cat rather than coffee; and to the person being read, the psychic medium might appear wrong when the psychic medium is actually just “misinterpreting” the message.
Our search can take us far and wide and consume an inordinate amount of our time and energy and when we do find someone who looks like ‘The One’, we sometimes already have a fantasy story in our heads about what he/she will be like. When we realise that ‘The One’ we have found falls short of our ideals and expectations, for a time we are beset with doubts and confusion. Am I mistaken? Is it my fault? Is it their fault? Whose fault is it?
I just wanted to let you know that your readings (tarot of the week) and reflections (from the other newletter, I don’t remember the name!) are always right on. They went through very difficult, and much happier times during these years and reading you has always been such a great support, so soothing, at times confronting, always insigthful. I often share it with my friends, when I see that they are particularly affected by the « energies of the week » and they greatly appreciate it as well!
In September 1878 the British medium Charles Williams and his fellow-medium at the time, A. Rita, were detected in trickery at Amsterdam. During the séance a materialized spirit was seized and found to be Rita and a bottle of phosphorus oil, muslin and a false beard were found amongst the two mediums.[82] In 1882 C. E. Wood was exposed in a séance in Peterborough. Her Indian spirit control "Pocka" was found to be the medium on her knees, covered in muslin.[83]
Like common playing cards, the tarot has four suits (which vary by region: French suits in Northern Europe, Latin suits in Southern Europe, and German suits in Central Europe). Each suit has 14 cards, ten pip cards numbering from one (or Ace) to ten and four face cards (King, Queen, Knight, and Jack/Knave). In addition, the tarot has a separate 21-card trump suit and a single card known as the Fool. Depending on the game, the Fool may act as the top trump or may be played to avoid following suit.[1] These tarot cards, without occult symbology, are still used throughout much of Europe to play card games.
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