^ "Glossary of Key Words Frequently Used in Parapsychology" Archived 2010-12-24 at the Wayback Machine, Parapsychological Association website. "Materialization: A phenomenon of physical mediumship in which living entities or inanimate objects are caused to take form, sometimes from ectoplasm." Retrieved January 24, 2006 "Medium – Definition". Dictionary.com. Retrieved 23 March 2007.
"Mental mediumship" is communication of spirits with a medium by telepathy. The medium mentally "hears" (clairaudience), "sees" (clairvoyance), and/or feels (clairsentience) messages from spirits. Directly or with the help of a spirit guide, the medium passes the information on to the message's recipient(s). When a medium is doing a "reading" for a particular person, that person is known as the "sitter".
The article about this phenomenon in Encyclopædia Britannica places emphasis that "… one by one spiritual mediums were convicted of fraud, sometimes using the tricks borrowed from scenic "magicians" to convince their paranormal abilities". In the article it is also noted that "… the opening of the wide ranging fraud happening on spiritualistic sessions caused serious damage to reputation of the movement of a Spiritualism and in the USA pushed it on the public periphery".[208] https://drive.google.com/file/d/1y5Nf16dWP74wWod3tdEZ2TTw0KpVA-UP/view?usp=sharing
What actually transpires during the trance is that the clairvoyant medium sees visions, hears voices, feels the energy and interprets his experiences in intelligible human language. The narration of the sequence of events is convincing as it divulges the secrets and facts, which are known only to the seeker. This revelation of personal facts builds trusts between the seeker and the clairvoyant medium.

The British medium Francis Ward Monck was investigated by psychical researchers and discovered to be a fraud. On November 3, 1876 during the séance a sitter demanded that Monck be searched. Monck ran from the room, locked himself in another room and escaped out of a window. A pair of stuffed gloves was found in his room, as well as cheesecloth, reaching rods and other fraudulent devices in his luggage.[80] After a trial Monck was convicted for his fraudulent mediumship and was sentenced to three months in prison.[81]
Knowing which questions to ask a psychic takes a little thought because the questions you think you want to ask will deliver little to no results. For example, passive questions like, "Will I ever get married?" "When will I meet my next boyfriend?" are impossible to answer because the future is not bound and determined. Instead, ask questions that can aid a current situation that could affect your life down the road - like marriage. A good example would be something like, "My partner and I seem to be hitting a wall. What are the most effective tactics for improving my relationship?" You also want to avoid questions that are begging for reassurance (Should I get divorced?) or that are full of doubt. Remember that standing up for yourself will get you farther than looking for a hand to hold. Instead, ask results-driven questions like, "Why am I no longer as connected with my partner now than when I was first married." The more precise you are with your questions, the better reading you will receive, so put a pen to paper before jumping on the phone.
Humans have been fascinated with contacting the dead since the beginning of human existence. Cave paintings by indigenous Australians date back 28,000 years, some depicting skulls, bones, spirits and the afterlife.[3] Other cave paintings in Indonesia date back a further 10,000 years.[4] Mediumship gained popularity during the nineteenth century, when ouija boards were used by the upper classes as a source of entertainment. Investigations during this period revealed widespread fraud—with some practitioners employing techniques used by stage magicians—and the practice began to lose credibility.[5][6] Fraud is still rife in the medium/psychic industry, with cases of deception and trickery being discovered to this day.[7]